Wednesday, August 5, 2009

No-Knead English Muffins with Oats and Cornmeal


No-Knead English Muffins with Oats and Cornmeal

These are drop dead easy and extremely delicious so plan to make them soon. This recipe is an adaptation of the Cornmeal-Oat English Muffins from the excellent cookbook, Great Whole Grain Breads by Beatrice Ojakangas. It is an inexpensive paperback and I think it should be in every bread baker's library.

Makes 10 muffins

1 package active dry yeast
1 cup warm water - 110 degrees F
1/4 c. canola oil
1 1/2 tsp. agave nectar
1 tsp. sea salt
1/4 c. yellow cornmeal
1/2 c. old-fashioned oats
2 1/2 to 3 c. unbleached flour
Extra cornmeal for dusting muffins and baking sheet

In a large bowl, dissolve yeast in water; let stand until yeast foams. Add oil, agave, salt, cornmeal, oats, and 1/2 c. of the unbleached flour; stir until smooth. Gradually add remaining flour, 1/2 c. at a time, stirring vigorously after each addition, until you have achieved a stiff dough as seen below. I like using my dough whisk for this purpose.



On a floured surface, roll out dough to a 1/3" thickness.Cut into rounds with a floured 4" cutter - if you don't have dedicated English muffin rings as seen below, just find a bowl or cup with a similar diameter. Place rounds on an ungreased baking sheet that has been lightly sprinkled with cornmeal. Sprinkle the tops with additional cornmeal but do it lightly - if you use too much cornmeal, your griddle will smoke. Been there, done that!




Let rise in warm place for 30 minutes. At this point they'll only rise about 10-20% but they'll rise a lot more on the griddle so don't worry.

Preheat a cast iron or other heavy griddle over medium heat. Use a spatula remove muffins from baking sheet and transfer them to the griddle. Cook for 6-8 minutes on each side or until lightly browned. Cool on a wire rack.

It is your choice whether you split your English muffins with a fork or use a serrated knife. This photo shows what both options end up looking like - the one on top was fork split.




Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 184 Calories; 6g Fat (28.7% calories from fat); 4g Protein; 28g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 0mg Cholesterol; 189mg Sodium. Exchanges: 2 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 1 Fat.

This post has been submitted to Yeastspotting, a great place for bread bakers.

11 comments:

Becca Elouise said...

Mmm, those look perfect!

Andrea said...

definitely fork-split. These look great!

Hannah said...

Absolutely beautiful! I've never had much luck making english muffins, but this makes me want to give it another try.

Nanette said...

Thanks Becca Elouise! BTW, you have a beautiful name!

Nanette said...

I agree Andrea - more nooks and crannies with fork-split muffins!

Nanette said...

Hannah, these are really easy. If you want thicker muffins roll out the dough to 1/2" and make fewer.

Mimi said...

I like that your english muffins have oats and cornmeal. I bet they were flavorful!

Nanette said...

Mimi, believe it or not the oats aren't really that noticeable in the texture of the English muffins. I think you can taste the cornmeal more than the oats.

Susan/Wild Yeast said...

I am of the fork-splitting persuasion, and these look so delicious!

Anonymous said...

Sorry for the possibly ignorant question--what exactly is meant by 'old-fashioned' oats? I have Irish steel-cut oats--the kind you have to cook for 20 or 30 minutes to make oatmeal. Will that do or is there something else I would need to get for this recipe?

Nanette said...

No I don't think steel-cut oats will work in this recipe. Old-fashioned oats are the same thing as rolled oats and they take about 5 minutes to cook. Here is a web site that talks about the difference in the type of oats http://www.chow.com/food-news/54417/whats-the-difference-between-types-of-oatmeal/
I hope this helps!

Nanette

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